Archive for the ‘Other Than Movies’ Category

Psst! Fox! DC Comics! Warners! Make ‘Batman’ on DVD happen.

July 21, 2009

So last summer, to commemorate the theatrical release of The Dark Knight, I did a ten-part review series called Batmania, in which I reviewed every Batman movie, in addition to some Batman-related spinoffs. I’m not going to lie—it was fun.

The first film I reviewed, Batman: The Movie, kinda’ baffled me. I knew of the campy TV series from the 60’s, but had grown up mostly with the dark Tim Burton-esque Batman (which, compared to The Dark Knight, looks a little campy itself). But recently I watched a documentary called Holy Batmania!, which explained the cultural climate surrounding the TV show. I finally got it–Batman was campy on purpose, because in the mid-60’s, anything superhero-related was considered poison. To produce a live-action show based on a comic book, the producers felt they had to be tongue-in-cheek about the whole thing, knowing that being ludicrous was the only way to get people to watch.

So now that I understand the context better, I want the series on DVD.

But there’s a problem. The original Batman TV series is like the one thing Warner Bros., DC Comics’ sister company, doesn’t have the distribution rights to. The show was produced at 20th Century Fox, but the rights to the characters still lies with DC. It’s kinda’ complex, and you can read a better explanation of it at TVShowsOnDVD.com.

Hell froze over a couple of years ago when Disney began releasing The Muppet Show on DVD, something I thought would NEVER happen. Could Fox, Warners and DC play nice (you kinda’ did it before, with the whole Watchmen lawsuit last year) and get a significant piece of Batman and television history out on DVD before my bones turn to dust? Does anybody have any new information?

This is funny: ‘Don’t I Know You?’

December 11, 2008

I don’t find a lot of web videos that funny.  But I stumbled upon this a few weeks ago and can’t stop recommending friends to check it out.  So here, friends.  Check it out.

Netflix this: ‘It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’

October 11, 2008

Halloween is probably my favorite holiday.  That’s not saying that every Halloween has been whiz-bang fun.  But I love dressing up, I loved the (not really) scariness of ghosts and black cats and bats and witches.  I loved Halloween as a kid (although growing up in Northern Canada meant trick-or-treating in sub-zero weather and a good 8-12 inches of snow in the ground, plus having to wear your snow suit under your costume).  Now, as an adult, I love seeing how excited my niece and nephew get about the holiday.

I recently watched It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown with my nephew.  He liked it, although near the end when Linus mistakes Snoopy for the Great Pumpkin he got a little freaked out and wanted me to turn it off.  He’s only four, so we can only hope that with subsequent annual viewings he’ll face his discomfort with a Santa figure in a Halloween special.  (It may be a while until he graduates to The Nightmare Before Christmas.)

It’s been a while since I myself had seen it.  As an adult, I obviously see it differently than I did as a kid, but that it also in part because the way I see the Peanuts comic strip has changed.  When I was young I absolutely loved Charles Schulz’s strip, but as I grew up my tastes became more refined and I embraced Calvin & Hobbes and The Far Side.  As an adult I look at the comics page in the newspaper and wonder why today’s comics are not funny at all.  Has my sense of humor changed so radically since I was a kid (yes), or have comics just never really been that funny to begin with (YES)?

I feared that watching The Great Pumpkin with an older set of eyes would result in disappointment.  I am happy to report that the special still retains a sense of wonder and innocence.  After all, Peanuts itself is seeing childhood through an older set of eyes, and while The Great Pumpkin is not really funny, there’s a magic to it that invokes those same feelings I had about Halloween as I did as a kid.

What’s it about? Linus (voiced by Chris Shea) is anxious for the arrival of the Great Pumpkin, the aforementioned Santa Claus of Halloween.  None of his friends nor his sister Lucy (Sally Dryer) believe in the Great Pumpkin and think Linus is stupid for doing so.  Instead of going trick or treating with the neighborhood kids, he waits in the pumpkin patch for the Great Pumpkin to bring presents and peace and goodwill to all men.

Meanwhile, Snoopy as the World War I Flying Ace’s plane/dog house is shot down over France.  Stranded in enemy territory, Snoopy must make it to safety without being caught by the Germans.  (This makes much more sense when you’re watching it.)

What’s good about it? I have always been a fan of the design and animation of the Charlie Brown specials.  The animation itself isn’t perfect–this, like A Charlie Brown Christmas, has some choppy editing–but that’s why it’s so appealing.  Unlike the crisp and luscious style of Sleeping Beauty (which I recently reviewed), The Great Pumpkin is hand-made and  sloppy, but no less lovingly crafted.  And at a running time of about 25 minutes, The Great Pumpkin knows not to overstay its welcome.

What’s bad about it? The cruelty of the other children towards Charlie Brown (Peter Robbins) would leave massive emotional and psychological scarring if he was a real kid.

Perfect for: Kids and grown-up kids.

’30 Rock’ Wins. And deservedly so.

September 22, 2008

30 Rock is the best comedy on television right now.  (Sorry, Office.)  Tina Fey has created a zany, loopy and–most of all–funny show about the behind-the-scenes antics at a Saturday Night Live-esque tv show.  Over the last two seasons Fey has become a very funny comedic actress, and she deserved her statuette last night.  I’ve never really been an Alec Baldwin fan, but since watching 30 Rock, I’ve come to appreciate his impeccable comedic timing.

A cross between The Muppet Show and Mary Tyler Moore, 30 Rock is the one show that is gleefully funny and silly.  If you haven’t gotten into 30 Rock, I recommend you do so.  You can watch episodes on NBC.com (in fact, the Season 3 premiere will be online October 23, a full week before it airs on TV), Hulu. com, Netflix and iTunes. If you like Arrested Development, Malcolm in the Middle, The Office or Seinfeld, 30 Rock is right up your alley.

In honor of 30 Rock’s seven Emmy wins–including Best Comedy, Best Actor in a Comedy (Alec Baldwin) and Best Actress in a Comedy (Tina Fey), I’ve posted one of my favorite episodes. Carrie Fisher was nominated for Best Guest Actres for this episode and, if you ask me, was robbed.  Enjoy!

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more about “Hulu – Rosemary’s Baby: 30 Rock“, posted with vodpod